English Grammar Conditionals

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English Conditionals

We use it to write sentences where there is a Condition and a Result. In this kind of sentences, it is generally used the conjunction "If" to indicate the Condition.

There exist different types of Conditionals, the Zero Conditional, the First Conditional, The Second and the Third Conditional.

The Zero Conditional refers to the universal truths, those which happen always that certain condition occurs. It is necessary to begin with an example to make it easier to understand... "If It is winter, it is cold". The condition is "If it is winter" and the result is "it is cold". You can alter the order, that is to say, you can first write the result and then the condition (it doesn't change the meaning of the sentence). The important thing is to respect the structure of the sentence, the condition must begin with "If" followed by the Subject and the verb conjugated in Simple Present. The result begins with the subject followed by the verb conjugated in Simple Present too. Take into account that the condition can be affirmative and the result negative and vice versa.

The First Conditional is used to talk about facts or situations that probably will happen in the future, if the condition takes place. It means that we are talking about probabilities. The rules are the same as in the Zero Conditional, but you must use other Tenses… The verb in the Condition must be conjugated into the Simple Present and the verb in the Result, into the Simple Future. The Second Conditional is called unreal or imaginary conditional. It is used to talk about imaginary situations that would happen if the condition would be real (but it is not). It is something hypothetical. The verb in the Condition Clause must be conjugated into the Simple Past and, in the Result Clause, you must write Would followed by the main verb.

As in the second conditional, The Third Conditional is used to talk about hypothetical situations but in the Past (something that could have happened in the past but it didn't). So, the verb in the Condition Clause must be conjugated into the Past Perfect and, in the Result Clause, you must write Would + have + the participle form of the verb.

Try our exercises and Tests, so you can check your progress when learning English, remember that it’s worth spending time with Conditionals, they will make the difference in your Grammar Exams.

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